London is a city of many bridges. In fact, there are over 200 bridges that span the River Thames. While some of these bridges are rather unassuming, others have become iconic landmarks in their own right. Here are ten of the most famous bridges of London.


Tower Bridge of London

Tower Bridge is one of the most iconic landmarks in all of London. The bridge, which was built in 1886-1894, crosses the River Thames close to the Tower of London. The bridge has become an iconic symbol of London and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. 

The bridge is a combined bascule and suspension bridge and was designed by Sir Horace Jones, the City Architect, and John Wolfe-Barry, his assistant. The construction of the bridge was completed in eight years and six million bricks were used in its construction. The total cost of the project was £1,184,000. 

In order to accommodate the increasing number of vehicles and pedestrians using the bridge, a major refurbishment project was undertaken in 1982. This involved strengthening the bridge’s foundations, adding new walkways on either side of the bridge, and painting the bridge’s superstructure with red, white, and blue stripes. 

Tower Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks and is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions. The bridge was built in 1886-1894 and was designed by Sir Horace Jones. The construction of the bridge took eight years to complete and cost £1,184,000. A major refurbishment project was undertaken in 1982 which involved strengthening the bridge’s foundations, adding new walkways on either side of the bridge, and painting the bridge’s superstructure with red, white, and blue stripes.

Westminster Bridge

Westminster bridge

The Beauty of Westminster Bridge

One of the most iconic bridges in London, Westminster Bridge spans the River Thames between Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament. The bridge is a beautiful sight, with its graceful arches and stunning views of some of London’s most famous landmarks. Here’s everything you need to know about Westminster Bridge.

A Brief History of Westminster Bridge

Westminster Bridge was designed by Charles Labelye and opened in 1750. The bridge was built at a time when London was rapidly expanding, and the need for a new crossing point over the Thames was becoming increasingly apparent. Westminster Bridge was the first stone bridge to span the river, and it quickly became one of the busiest crossings in London.

In 1862, the original bridge was replaced by a new iron bridge designed by John Rennie. The new bridge was wider than the old one and had decorative Gothic details. The Rennie bridge stood for nearly 150 years before it was replaced by the current bridge, which was designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette and opened in 1868.

The current Westminster Bridge is made of cast iron and granite and has a total length of 809 feet (247 meters). It is one of only two bridges in London that are painted green (the other being Putney Bridge). 

What to See from Westminster Bridge

Westminster Bridge offers some of the best views in London. On one side of the bridge, you can see Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament, and St. Margaret’s Church. On the other side, you can see the London Eye, County Hall, and Tate Modern. No matter which way you look, there’s something to see!

Whether you’re admiring its graceful arches or taking in stunning views, there’s no denying that Westminster Bridge is one of London’s most beautiful landmarks. Next time you’re in London, be sure to take a stroll across this iconic bridge and enjoy all it has to offer.

3. Millennium Footbridge

Millennium Footbridge

The Millennium Footbridge, also known as the Wobbly Bridge, is a pedestrian bridge located in London, England. The bridge spans the River Thames and connects the South Bank with the City of London. 

The Millennium Footbridge was built to commemorate the turn of the millennium and was opened to the public on June 10, 2000. However, due to safety concerns, the bridge was closed just two days after it opened. The bridge reopened to the public on February 22, 2002 after extensive repairs were made. 

The Millennium Footbridge is one of the most popular tourist attractions in London. Every year, millions of people visit the bridge to take in the views of the river and the cityscape. The bridge is also a popular spot for photography enthusiasts. 

If you’re planning on visiting the Millennium Footbridge, there are a few things you should keep in mind. First, there is no charge to walk across the bridge. Second, the best time to visit is during daylight hours so that you can fully appreciate the views. Finally, be sure to wear comfortable shoes as there is a lot of walking involved. 

Whether you’re a tourist or a local, the Millennium Footbridge is definitely worth a visit. Just be sure to plan ahead and wear comfortable shoes!

4. Lambeth Bridge

If you find yourself in London and are looking to take in some of the city’s iconic sights, then a walk across Lambeth Bridge should definitely be on your list. Located just south of Westminster Bridge, Lambeth Bridge spans the River Thames and offers stunning views of some of London’s most famous landmarks. In this blog post, we’ll give you a brief overview of Lambeth Bridge and some of the things you can see when you’re there.

Lambeth Bridge is a suspension bridge that was opened in 1932. It was designed by Sir George Humphreys and is one of only two bridges in London that are painted red (the other being Tower Bridge). The bridge spans the River Thames and has a total length of 1,220 feet (372 meters).

When you’re on Lambeth Bridge, there are plenty of things to see. To the north, you’ll get a great view of the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben. To the south, you’ll be able to see the London Eye and County Hall. And if you look to the east or west, you’ll get a glimpse of some of London’s other famous bridges, including Westminster Bridge and Waterloo Bridge.

Whether you’re a tourist or a local, a walk across Lambeth Bridge is a great way to take in some of London’s most iconic sights. From the Houses of Parliament to the London Eye, there’s plenty to see when you’re on the bridge. So next time you find yourself in London, be sure to add Lambeth Bridge to your list of places to visit.

5. Vauxhall Bridge

Vauxhall Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks. The bridge spans the River Thames between Lambeth and Vauxhall, and has been a vital part of London’s transportation infrastructure for over 150 years. Today, the bridge is used by over 50,000 vehicles every day, and is a popular spot for tourists and locals alike.

History of Vauxhall Bridge

Vauxhall Bridge was designed by Sir Alexander Binnie and opened in 1906. The original bridge was made of iron, but was replaced with a steel bridge in 1939. The bridge was closed to vehicles in 2002 so that it could be repaired and strengthened, and reopened in 2006.

Today, Vauxhall Bridge is used by over 50,000 vehicles every day. The bridge is also a popular spot for pedestrians and cyclists, as there are dedicated walkways and cycle lanes on either side of the bridge. 

Vauxhall Bridge is also a popular tourist spot, thanks to its stunning views of the River Thames, the Houses of Parliament, Big Ben, and the London Eye. If you’re visiting London, be sure to add Vauxhall Bridge to your list of places to see!

Vauxhall Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks. Spanning the River Thames between Lambeth and Vauxhall, the bridge has been a vital part of London’s transportation infrastructure for over 150 years. Today, the bridge is used by over 50,000 vehicles every day, and is a popular spot for tourists and locals alike. Thanks to its stunning views of the River Thames, the Houses of Parliament, Big Ben, and the London Eye, Vauxhall Bridge should definitely be on your list of places to see when visiting London!

6. Chelsea Bridge

Standing majestically over the River Thames, Chelsea Bridge has been a London landmark for over 150 years. The current bridge, which opened in 1937, is the third bridge to have occupied the site. Join us as we take a look at the history of this iconic bridge.

The first Chelsea Bridge was built in 1858 and was a suspension bridge designed by James Walker. Unfortunately, the bridge proved to be too weak to support the weight of the ever-increasing traffic and so it was replaced by a new bridge in 1887. The second Chelsea Bridge, an imposing structure made of wrought iron, was designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette. 

Like its predecessor, the second bridge also proved to be inadequate for the increasing traffic levels and so, in 1932, work began on the construction of the current Chelsea Bridge. The new bridge was designed by Lord Arundel of Wardour and was built with seven thousand tons of steel. It cost £1.2 million to build and was opened by King George VI in 1937. 

Today, Chelsea Bridge is one of London’s most popular tourist attractions and provides stunning views of some of the city’s most iconic landmarks, including the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben. If you’re visiting London, be sure to add a visit to Chelsea Bridge to your list!

Chelsea Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks and has been standing over the River Thames since 1858. The current bridge, which is made of steel and took seven thousand tons of steel to construct, is the third bridge to occupy the site. If you’re visiting London, be sure to add a visit to Chelsea Bridge to your list! You won’t be disappointed!

7. Putney Bridge

Putney Bridge is a bridge that spans the River Thames in southwest London. It is one of the busiest bridges in London, with over 140,000 vehicles and 2,000 pedestrians crossing it every day. Putney Bridge is also a popular spot for sightseeing, with views of Putney Pier, the Houses of Parliament, and St. Paul’s Cathedral.

History of Putney Bridge

Putney Bridge was built in 1729 and was the first bridge to cross the River Thames in London. It was designed by Sir Edward Coyningham and was built with stone from Putney Heath. The bridge was originally toll-free, but a toll was introduced in 1771 to pay for its upkeep. In 1887, the bridge was bought by the Metropolitan Board of Works. 

In 1928, the original Putney Bridge was replaced by a new bridge that was built to the north of the old one. The new bridge was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and was built with granite from Cornwall. The old bridge was demolished in 1929. 

The current Putney Bridge is 709 feet long and has a width of 36 feet. It has eight lanes for traffic and two pedestrian walkways. 

Fun Facts about Putney Bridge

-In 1841, Charles Dickens wrote a short story called “The Ghost at No. 13” which is set on Putney Bridge. 

-In 1846, George Eliot wrote a novel called “The Mill on the Floss” which features a scene where the protagonist Maggie Tulliver drowns herself in the River Thames from Putney Bridge. 

-In 1944, a German V-1 flying bomb hit Putney Bridge and killed six people. 

-In 1950, author J.B Priestley wrote an essay called “An English Journey” which features his experience crossing Putney Bridge on a bus. 

-In 2006, a man named Roger Deakins won an Oscar for Best Cinematography for his work on the film “The Departed”. One of the scenes in the film features Leonardo DiCaprio’s character walking across Putney Bridge at night. 

If you’re looking for a way to cross the River Thames, Putney Bridge is definitely your best bet! With its convenient location and rich history, Putney Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks.

8. Waterloo Bridge

Located in the heart of London, Waterloo Bridge spans the River Thames between Southwark and the City of Westminster. The bridge, which is a Grade II listed structure, is considered one of the finest examples of early 19th-century architecture in the city. Here’s a brief history of this iconic London landmark.

Construction on Waterloo Bridge began in 1811 and was completed in 1817. The bridge was designed by John Rennie, who also designed Southwark Bridge and London Bridge. At the time of its completion, Waterloo Bridge was the longest-span bridge in the world. 

The bridge was initially named after the Battle of Waterloo, which took place in 1815. However, following the death of Duke Wellington in 1852, the bridge was renamed Wellington Bridge. In 1939, the name was changed back to Waterloo Bridge to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. 

During World War II, Waterloo Bridge was badly damaged by German bombs. It was closed to traffic in May 1940 and wasn’t reopened until December 1945. In 2002, a major refurbishment project was completed that involved replacing all of the bridge’s decking and parapets. 

Today, Waterloo Bridge is a popular spot for tourists and locals alike. On a clear day, visitors can get stunning views of some of London’s most famous landmarks, including Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, and St. Paul’s Cathedral. 

Waterloo Bridge is one of London’s most iconic landmarks. The bridge spans the River Thames between Southwark and Westminster and is considered one of the finest examples of early 19th-century architecture in the city. If you’re visiting London, be sure to add a walk across Waterloo Bridge to your itinerary!

9. London Bridge

For centuries, London Bridge was the only bridge over the River Thames in London. As such, it was an important crossing point for both people and goods. These days, there are dozens of bridges spanning the Thames, but London Bridge remains one of the most popular tourist destinations in the city. Here’s everything you need to know about visiting London Bridge.

History of London Bridge

The first London Bridge was built by the Romans in 50 AD. It was made from wood and stood for nearly 600 years. In the 12th century, however, the bridge began to fall into disrepair and was eventually demolished. The second London Bridge, which was built of stone, replaced it in 1209. That bridge also fell into disrepair and was eventually demolished and replaced—this time with a new bridge made of iron and granite. 

The current London Bridge was built in 1973 and is now a Grade II listed building. It spans 928 feet (283 meters) and has a total of six lanes for vehicular traffic. The bridge also has two pedestrian walkways that offer stunning views of the river and the city skyline.

Things to Do at London Bridge

In addition to simply crossing the bridge, there are plenty of things to do at London Bridge. One popular activity is taking a tour of Tower Bridge, which is located just downriver from London Bridge. Tower Bridge is one of the most iconic bridges in London, thanks in part to its two Gothic-style towers and its bascule (drawbridge) design. Other popular activities include taking a river cruise on the Thames or visiting one of the many museums and galleries located nearby, such as the Tate Modern or HMS Belfast. 

Whether you’re interested in its history or you just want to enjoy stunning views of the River Thames, London Bridge is definitely worth a visit when you’re in London. With so much to see and do in the area, you could easily spend an entire day exploring all that this part of the city has to offer.

10. Southwark Bridge

Southwark Bridge is one of the lesser-known bridges in London but it is no less impressive. This beautiful bridge spans the River Thames and connects the districts of Southwark and City of Westminster. It is a busy thoroughfare for both pedestrians and vehicles, with stunning views of the river and nearby landmarks. Keep reading to find out more about Southwark Bridge and why it is worth a visit next time you are in London.

History of Southwark Bridge

Southwark Bridge was designed by John Rennie and opened in 1819. It was the first iron bridge over the River Thames and took almost 10 years to construct. The bridge replaced an earlier wooden bridge that had been built in medieval times. Rennie’s design was based on that of an ancient Greek temple, with eight Doric columns on each side supporting the roadway above. 

The original bridge was painted green but was later repainted red, leading to its nickname of “London’s Red Bridge”. In 1921, the City of London Corporation decided to repaint the bridge back to its original green color. The current paint job dates from 1984. 

What to See on Southwark Bridge

There is plenty to see when crossing Southwark Bridge, especially if you take some time to enjoy the views from the pedestrian walkway on either side of the road. On the south side of the bridge, you can see Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, while on the north side you can see St Paul’s Cathedral. If you are lucky enough to have clear weather, you will also be able to see some of London’s other iconic landmarks such as Big Ben and The Houses of Parliament in the distance. 

If you are interested in learning more about the history of London’s bridges, there is a plaque on the north side of Southwark Bridge which details their construction dates and architects. 

Next time you are in London, be sure to take a stroll across Southwark Bridge and enjoy all that this historic landmark has to offer. With its stunning views and central location, it is sure to be a highlight of your trip!

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